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Rap Videos As Viral Marketing Campaigns with Chris Record

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Episode Recap:

Recently, I had the pleasure of chatting with Chris Record, a marketing genius known for his viral rap videos. Chris originally did a rap for ClickFunnels just for fun which outperformed an ad that cost 100’s of thousands of dollars. So on this episode of the Marketing Secrets podcast, we explore the world of short-form content and how it can revolutionize your marketing strategy when it is done correctly. Normally, this kind of insider knowledge is reserved for high-ticket masterminds, but in this episode, Chris and I break down these strategies for everyone.

Chris Record and I cover a variety of topics that are essential for marketers looking to stand out in today's digital landscape. From blending education with entertainment to creating content that captures and holds attention, we provide actionable insights that you can start using immediately.

Key Highlights:

  • Using Edutainment: Learn how to combine education and entertainment to create engaging marketing content.
  • Powerful Short-Form Content: Discover strategies for crafting short-form videos that drive engagement and conversions.
  • Effective Storytelling: Understand the power of storytelling in making your content memorable and impactful
  • Series-Based Content: Get tips on developing series-based content to keep your audience hooked.
  • Real Pattern Interrupts: Find out how to use pattern interrupts and the variable reward system to capture attention.

Whether you're just starting out or looking to refine your strategy, this episode is packed with valuable advice to help you elevate your marketing game. Tune in and get ready to transform your approach to content creation!

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Best Quote:

The whole game of marketing is about pattern interrupts, right?
A rap showing up in your news feed is a pattern interrupt. Using these series is a pattern interrupt versus everyone else who's doing the pattern. And I think a lot of people are going to be too scared or too nervous to do that kind of thing. So those who are willing to be the early adopters and shift that way are going to have huge results from it.

Sponsors: 

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Transcript:

Chris Record:
...just had no idea that it would be so big. I just did it for fun, because one of my videographers just said it would be a good idea. And I thought, might as well try. And we did a rap and we ran it for all of our market and everything, we ended up doing multiple millions of dollars in business. But I think this is the future. I think short form video content for entrepreneurs is the future. It's a little viral recipe. Music just makes it relatable, it makes it fun. It's like a dopamine hit. You want to be that dopamine hit when they're scrolling through. As long as you can get that scroll stop and kick in that variable reward system, the dopamine, then your ads are going to perform well. Short form content ads are probably one of the biggest trends right now for the next 24 to 36 months. It's the most slept on thing, especially now in 2024, that every entrepreneur should be doing is creating short form marketing pieces for their funnels and for their long form content.

Russell Brunson:
I'm here today with Chris Record, who is someone I've known for the last, I don't know, 10 years or so, or more than that, I guess. And I'm excited, because today we were talking about something different and unique, which is a different way to advertise your businesses using edutainment, is what he calls it. And I'll tell you the story ahead of time, and then we'll jump into this. But we had just given the Harmon Brothers half a million dollars to make an ad, and it was huge productions, lights, cameras, I mean this huge thing. We launched this video and it did well. And then I feel like it was the same week or week after, Dave got an email from you and you're like, "Hey, I made you guys a ClickFunnels rap." And we got it and it was this rap with you as a rapper, Sunny D, and we're like, I don't know what to do with this.

And so we just threw it up and ran it as an ad, and the Sunny D video actually out-converted, got us more trials than the Harmon Brothers video we spent half a million dollars on, plus ad spend, which is crazy. And it was the first time I've ever seen something like this. I didn't know even why you did it for us, which was kind of cool. But anyway, so my guest today, his name's Chris Record, he's been doing these really cool raps. Right now we're doing another whole project with him doing short form ads. And so, if you're looking for a different unique way to get people's attention, to stop the scroll, that's just different and fun and unique and your audience will love it, then hire Chris to build the rap for you. I promise you, you will not regret it. We haven't. And I'm pumped to have you here on the podcast, man. How are you doing?

Chris:
Yeah. Always a pleasure to be here. Well, so to follow up on your story, I was coming out to your bubble soccer event. And I was on the plane and my friend Peter says, "You should write a rap for Russell, and just spit it to him there and see if he likes it." So I just wrote something on the plane, but you were so busy at that event, I never really had a chance to do it. I'm like, now I got these lyrics, we might as well go make a video. So we just made the video and said, "Here you go. Hopefully you guys like it." We had no idea that it would be one of your top converting ads though.

Russell:
How long did it take you? I have noted the whole process from writing to produce, it looks like this huge production. Is it? Or I don't know how that all works.

Chris:
It's actually not a huge production at all. So most all my videos, we basically, a lot of them, we write the lyrics, record, and film all in the same day. So we just make it up on the spot. That one I wrote on the plane. When I got back in town, we just filmed it out in my driveway. And we just filmed it, we just got a couple little smoke bombs and stuff like that. And then we got a couple shots in the supermarket. We just went in the supermarket and filled it up with juice.

Russell:
Get some Sunny Ds in there.

Chris:
Yeah, we just stole some shots in the supermarket. It probably took a total of three hours of filming, and then maybe a total, my editor probably spent five hours editing.

Russell:
That's crazy. I bet most people watch this probably haven't seen it. It was probably, how many years, six, seven years ago now?

Chris:
2017.

Russell:
Yeah, so I'm going to show you guys a clip from this show real quick just so you can see exactly what we're talking about, see some context as we're moving in. So with that said, let's watch a little bit of the Sunny D commercial.

Chris Record Music Video:
Shout out to Russell for building out the sickest. Super-cali-funnel-isic system to rack up them clicks. Funnels, click funnels, click. Ain't no traffic better than my high converting click funnels click funnels, click. As I look online, they don't do it like my click funnels, click funnels, click. And all these bad marketers they want the leads. They want the leads. They want the leads. Now it's for some action, no more time for practice.

Russell:
All right, so now, I'm curious because again, I don't know the whole history of everything, but you had a big business doing Shopify stuff ahead of time, right? And then you sold that, or shut it down or something, and then you started doing this. And this has become one of your core businesses for the last few years, right?

Chris:
Yeah, so the quick story about that is I grew up freestyle rapping. And when I became a businessman, I thought that I had to kind of ditch all that kind of stuff like rap.

Russell:
You had to become a business professional now.

Chris:
I even started wearing suits and stuff. And I thought that's what I had to do, as part of my journey was leaving my old friends, leaving my old past. So I left rap in the past, and then once I started become successful, I hired a videographer. My videographer was just one day saying he wanted be a rapper. I say, "Oh, I used to rap." Kind of joking around, and in the middle of this like, "Oh, I used to rap." He's like, "You should make a rap then." And I wrote my first song, it was called Life of an Entrepreneur. It's like the first song I ever wrote in my life. This was in 2016. So I mean from a kid until then, and I wrote that song and I made a little music video, just collage, and it did 4 million views on YouTube.

Russell:
This is for your own, we're you selling a product at the back of it?

Chris:
No, I wasn't even selling a product. I just did it for fun, because one of my videographers just said it would be a good idea, and I thought might as well try. And I just had no idea that it would be so big. Since it was so popular, I just started making more and more music videos. At first, I just started them for my own company, my own brand, and I did Entrepreneurs Got Choices, got Billie Jean in it. That one did millions of views. So I just got this lucky start. Not every video did very well after that, but that lucky start was enough to get me motivated.
And then I just started reaching out to businesses. So I reached out to Shopify and I said, "Hey, I could do a rap for you." And we did a rap and we ran it for all of our market and everything. We ended up doing multiple millions of dollars in business with Shopify as a result, flew out there and everything. So then I just started doing them for businesses and everybody loved them, including ClickFunnels. I've done at least a couple now for you guys.

Russell:
He actually came and actually performed at Funnel Hacking Live on stage as Sunny D. So not only was there a video, there was a live performance that happened as well.

Chris:
Yeah, it's edutainment. The reason we do it, it's not that I'm trying to be the next Drake or the next performer, it's just business music. So it's just taking the lyrics of Funnels and you know, CPA, and LTV, Lifetime Value, things that people only know in our industry, and then putting them into a rap song. It's kind of fun. Now you're hearing about dreams, ambition, success, everything into music. You kind of listen along. It's different, it's entertaining, but it still has a business message, so I love it.

Russell:
So what are some of the other companies you've done these full raps for?

Chris:
Oh God, I've done them for a bunch of companies. I've done them for software companies. I've done them for marketing companies. At the end of the day, the kind of clients that I'm looking for are clients that can run ads with them, because I think that's more successful. Or at least they want to use them at their events, like Kealuk and I, for example, at every single one of his events, he plays my music videos that I made for his company, and it just pumps people up. And I make entire theme songs for companies. I even do software tools, like software tools, I'll go into detail about how to use them. I did a book review for Hal Elrod's, Miracle Morning. I did his entire book summary all in a rap as an example. Oh, I just have fun with all this stuff and I've got maybe about 200 songs written. About 50, 60 music videos on YouTube alone, and just about another a hundred songs in my pocket no one's even heard.

Russell:
You can put it together like an album and try to, I don't know if you remember Armand Moore back in the day wrote a country album, and then did internet marketing stuff to get it on the top 100 billboard list for country music. Have you ever thought about doing that, or have done that.

Chris:
I've never even thought about doing it. I mean, keep in mind, I still run my whole business on top of all this. So I just do it in my spare time, and we just do it off the cuff. I've never really taken music seriously, but I love doing it. You got to have some balance of work and passion. So when I feel I'm working too much and I'm starting to get stressed out, I'll usually start doing some music and it really just puts me in a good mood. But maybe we'll take it somewhere.

Russell:
Yeah. Well, I wanted to have you here, because I think there's probably a lot of people may have heard this introduction, and been like, "Well, I'm not going to make a rap that scares me to death." But we just decided to do a project together in the last two weeks, some of you guys as we'll see it here, I just freestyle rapped live. So that's coming to an ad near you very, very soon. But you've kind of started transitioning, instead of long form three and a half minute music videos, but shorter form stuff. And the first person I saw doing this, and it wasn't someone who was in the business world like we are, but my kids started messaging me. My kids were like, "Dad, check this out. This guy's doing these cool series called Spin the Globe.

And so all my kids were obsessed with this guy. So I started watching it and his name's Connor Price, and he's got these little short form series where he is doing these things. And so we started watching his channel as a family and watching these things, and I was like, "There's some parallel to our business." I wasn't sure what it was, and I tried to make a couple videos based on stuff I'd seen him do, they were pretty cringe worthy, at least my kids told me they were. I was proud of them. But you messaged me a month ago and you're like, "Hey, I want to try this new thing where we're using short form videos with rap and stuff like that." I'd love to hear some of your context behind that, because I think this is something that a lot of people can be doing. You don't have to rap, but this concept is so powerful as a way to get traffic into any business you want.

Chris:
Yeah, so first things first, Connor Price. Love him. You guys check out Connor Price. And also did you know he is local here in Vegas? He's just right down the street from here. Yeah, he's local.

Russell:
I want to get, do you know him very, have you met him?

Chris:
I mean, we can probably set something up. I'll-

Russell:
So our next Funnel Hacking Live is here in Vegas. I was thinking of having him come and rap would be one of the coolest things.

Chris:
Yeah.

Russell:
Let's figure out how to set that up.

Chris:
I think he'd be wide open to that. Connor, you're wide open to that.

Russell:
Let's do it, man.

Chris:
Okay, so you guys should study, if you like Marketing Secrets, you should study Conner Price, because Conner Price is an independent musician. He was releasing videos on YouTube and they really weren't doing well. Okay, they were just kind of showing off his skills, but they weren't gaining any traction. Then what he did was he moved to short form videos, specifically TikToks, Reels, stuff like that, and he started doing little skits that would lead into his music. So instead of just doing music, which is all he'd been doing, he thought, let me think of something about my song and let me do a skit.

So an example is, if there's a violin instrument in the music, then what he'll do is he'll incorporate a guy with a violin in his little skit. And then suddenly the beat will go on, he'll tell the producer, "Put this on as a beat." And then he'll start rapping, and it just makes it more entertaining, and it makes it more viral, it makes it more engaging. People enjoy it. There's another one where there's a flute sound inside of his video, and so he literally just has a guy drilling and making a flute out of a vegetable, and then playing it and he's like, "Whoa. Put on the beat." Yeah, playing the flute Carrot. And he's like, "Whoa, put on a beat."

Connor Price Video:
Yo, yo, what is he doing?

Oh, yeah. So he was telling me that if you cut a carrot a certain way, you can play it like a flute.
He really thinks it's going to work.

Apparently it's a thing.

Just ignore him. Ready?

Yeah. Do me a favor. Pull up that one-

Pull up that one session with-

Yeah, look, they said that I couldn't do it, so I went and did it. W's only, you know I been winning. Winning. Top of the world, the globe is spinning. Spinning. If you know, you know I've been on a, what? Mission. Mission. Got a little time on my hands like a wristwatch, I don't got-

Chris:
What I like about what he does is he's thinking further about how to actually be a marketer rather than just a musician. Too many musicians are thinking about just how to make music. And the problem is there's so many great musicians in the world, but they're starving at the same time, right? They're not becoming successful. And this is Marketing Secrets, everything is about marketing. If more musicians learn how to market, they'll blow up. And Connor Price is basically becoming a marketer. He's saying, okay, I got this good song now how can I put a skit in the front of it to be able to get attention and eyeballs to it? And then also on these platforms, you can't really tell people to just download my music. They don't like those calls to action. So he really has to work hard to get these Spotify downloads, and so he'll come up with all these creative little ways to get you to go look at the link in the bio and stuff like that.

I think if you guys can just watch Connor Price, it's very, very entertaining, and you're going to see a marketing message there. But I think this is the future. I think short form video content for entrepreneurs is the future. I think entrepreneurs should be doing more short form, bottom line. I think they should be incorporating more entertainment, finding ways to make it... Let me give you an example, let's say that you want to teach something. You want to teach how to have a sales conversation or how to close a sale, instead of just saying, here's how to close a sale. Here's how to overcome an objection. Why don't you do a little skit where you're talking to you and you're over there. You just film yourself here doing the lines and you film yourself there doing the lines. And you're actually closing yourself on a sale and then you're closed. Just like that, a little skit with yourself twice is already going to be exponentially better. It's going to get more views. The skits don't have to be hard.

Russell:
Guys, for those who haven't seen Connor, half of the characters in the skits are just him. It's like him, then him with the glasses, him is the nerdy one version of him, and the producer's him, and the singer. He's using him for most of all the characters, which is really fun.

Chris:
So you could put on a pair of glasses and just a different hoodie, and that's it. You don't have to go crazy. People know it's still you, so you don't have to pretend, you don't have to put on a fake beard. They know it's you, but it's more entertaining. That's the little thing to look for.

Russell:
I actually did one. Do you guys want to see, we can throw mine real quick if you want to see it.

Chris:
Let's do it.

Russell:
This is one I did, basically me and then me with glasses, so check this out.

Russell Brunson Video:
Dude.

What?

Did you seriously pay $10,000 for a $35 book on eBay?

Oh, yeah.

Have you actually done the math on that?

Wait, what do you mean, math?

It's $294.11 cents per page.

Well, this is actually a first edition book written by Napoleon Hill in the year 1921. It's actually 16 years before Think and Grow Rich was even published. Check it out.

Dude, these pages aren't even that big. That's literally like a dollar per word. It's called The Magic Ladder, and Napoleon actually walks you through the 16 steps you have to follow if you want to have success in any area of your life.

You're even paying a dollar for the filler words. Like, uh and the.
I'm actually just about to record a podcast to go over the core secrets that I learned inside of this book.

Dude, I don't know how to tell you this, but I think you got ripped off.

Well, you know what they say, those who pay, pay attention. I've actually already read this book three times today. And I'm pretty sure that I'm the only person alive on this planet who's actually read this book. It's like finding buried treasure, literally the best 10K I've ever spent.

But what did you actually learn?

I'm actually literally just about to share all of the secrets, so if you are subscribed to the YouTube channel or the podcast, the episode will be dropping later on this week.
Dude, I don't want to wait, just tell me right now.

Sure, for $10,000.

Come on.

Russell:
All right, so that was, was it cringe worthy? My kids think it is, they were embarrassed. But that was the first one I did after watching Connor. I think what's interesting, when I was watching Connor's stuff, I was looking at, again, how do we relate this to most of our businesses? Connor's product is his music on Spotify. That's what he wants to get. So most people, they put their music on Spotify and hope, or for a lot of us, maybe it's YouTube is a thing we're focusing on, or our podcast, or whatever our long form thing is. So we put it out there and then we hope. And I look at this for each one of his songs that are on Spotify, he's probably doing 30, 40, 50 skits to get people to download songs.

I was thinking, that one that I made right there, if you noticed at the end of it, I was pitching my YouTube video. I had a long form 30 minute YouTube video talking about this old book I found, and I was like, how do get people to actually watch this? I posted on YouTube and some people saw it, but I was like, I want more energy. So I'm like, I'm going to make a funny skit on my short forms to then push people to the long form. Just like he's using short form to push people to Spotify, which is his long form. You know what I mean? And I think that I stopped after one, but you could make 10, 20, 30 shorts, and different conversations all pushing back to the one thing.

Chris:
Yeah, I think that's what a lot of people don't understand is actually the purpose of shorts. Shorts are where the attention is. You get attention, you need to drive them somewhere. Think about Connor's Spotify as just simply a product. That's just his product, that's his Funnel, if you will. That's his offer. So we all have an offer of some kind, right? When he makes one single song and he releases one single song, he's got a marketing campaign that's going to be, how many multiple different short videos can I create to hit this from a different angle? There might be one where he's just in front of a backdrop doing an interview, promoting it. There might be one where he is just walking down the street, just rapping it. There might be another one where he does a whole little skit leading up to it.

There could be another one where he just with a friend hanging out and saying, "Hey, let's just do this." He's going to think of multiple different skits, because these are all little marketing pieces that are going to drive traffic back to his main product. So if we think about this, let's say I launch a course. Let's say I create a course that teaches people Facebook advertising, instead of just launching a course, I should also think what are going to be multiple marketing videos that are going to be valuable and entertaining to drive attention back to this course, instead of just hoping the course does well.

That's what too many marketers do. They'll load a YouTube video and be like, "I didn't get any views." Or they're making posts, and they're getting three, four likes. They don't realize you got to have a main thing that you're driving people to, and then a bunch of little marketing pieces. You've got Funnels, right? So Funnels is the perfect thing to drive people into. A Funnel is going to convert traffic into leads and sales, but without traffic it's not going to make sense. Organic social media, short form media, you can use it organically and get free traffic. You can run it with paid ads and literally go viral with these things. It's the most slept on thing, especially now in 2024 that every entrepreneur should be doing is creating short form marketing pieces for their Funnels and for their long form content, it would be an absolute win.

Russell:
Okay, so right now we're doing a project together. Walk them through the strategy of what you're doing with me. So they kind of see a very practical application of, because I saw this, I saw the vision, I saw like, and we're jumping and running with it right now with you.

Chris:
Yeah. Okay, so a few things. So what we're doing is, we did long form videos and we ran those. Those are very successful. Now we're going to do short form videos, like 60 seconds or less. We just did one right now where Russell freestyle raps. You guys got to check that out. That's going to be amazing.

Russell:
Should we show it to people? Should we let them see it?

Chris:
Maybe.

Russell:
Maybe at the end. We'll see.

Chris:
It depends on if the ad's out or not. They might've already seen it by the time this is here. Yeah, stay to the end to see, if you want to see this rap. But Russell raps, whatever. And so the idea is like-

Russell:
Whatever, this is a big deal. I'm rapping for the first time in my life. Sorry.

Chris:
It's pretty big. It's pretty big. And it was fun to film. And so the example would be, okay, the plot is Russell raps, right? So there's something that's entertaining, but we got to have, for short form you got to have a little storytelling. So we have to do a little pre-build, just a little pre-build with a little bit of story. So we're on a podcast, let's get into a rap. And then at the end you have to have a call to action, but you don't want your call to action to be blatant that says like, "Okay, everybody, this is an ad." You want it to feel organic. And so, that's what we did. We did a little back and forth podcast. We busted into a rap, and then we'd like, hey, we should just run this as an ad. And there you go, it's an ad.

So we have a series of these little skits, little short form skits, that we can use to just point out the One Funnel Away, to point out the ClickFunnels program, the free trial to do it, and we can mix in basically a little skit. I could be teaching something on the whiteboard, and then I could have myself on the couch not understanding, and then back to the speaker, and then I just rap it to myself. And then myself, now I'm understanding, because it's in rap lyrics and I'm taking notes. You could just have more fun, it's more entertaining. It works a little bit better for ads. And short form content right now is one of the best forms of content to do paid ads with, because first of all, the views, you could just sort millions of views effortlessly.

The share ability of short form content is really, really good, as long as it's not too corny of an ad. As long as it feels pretty native and it's fun. People are tagging their friends in there, people are going crazy. So your cost on these ads is super low and the conversion is still high, because when you're running ads you can always have the link underneath. I think that short form content ads are probably one of the biggest trends right now for the next 24 to 36 months. And I'm excited to be doing, what we're doing like five together already right now.

Russell:
Yeah, I'm excited to test it too. Now that we've got, the one that I was, I'm only in one of the five or six we've got going on, but I'm excited to see how rolls out.

Chris:
So far. So far. I might come out to you and do another one. That was fun.

Russell:
This might be the beginning of my official rap career. We're going to have the Russell Brunson rap album.

Chris:
Or are you going to do like Ben Shapiro did and he retired after one rap? You're going to have to put a whole post that just says, you've retired.

Russell:
And I'm done. Yeah.

Chris:
You're done.

Russell:
I dropped the mic. I'm done forever, which is awesome. So I'm curious for your own business, are you using this stuff in your own business right now, or more doing it for clients, or how is that all working?

Chris:
Yeah. I've always used it for my own business. I would say half of my music videos for my own business and half are for clients. So my whole process of my own marketing is built on what I call KLT factor, which I'm sure you know, KLT is know, like, and trust. You want people to know you, like you, and trust you. So there's a few ways you could do this. One is you could build a big brand for years, which you've done. You've been at this for, I mean a couple decades.

Russell:
Forever.

Chris:
Maybe longer than a couple decades, really building the Russell Brunson brand. For me, for example, I always wear an orange hat if they don't know why, it's because I ran some ad campaigns that were really heavy. People recognized me with an orange hat, so I made that part of my brand. This makes me more memorable. People start to remember who I am, so they know me. And then, like and trust. Like is really going to be built off of, are you likable? Do you have a personality? Are you delivering value to people? Are people enjoying what you do? Trust is going to really be built when your message is actually making an impact on them. Maybe they went through a course and they learned something. Maybe they're just really getting inspired or motivated by you. Trust is built when they start to realize, wow, this person's really, even on a free level, really helping me.

So my whole entire methodology is built know, like, and trust factor, KLT. And music really does this. Music just makes it relatable, it makes it fun. People get a chance to know me from all different types of circles. I have a chance to introduce my brands, but it's all that spillover from all that music. Then they always ask me, "Where can I buy your stuff? Where can I buy your stuff?" And so I always have membership sites, I always have clubs, I always have courses, and I've done that for years. And done, probably grossed roughly around 40 million in sales. Not quite Russell Brunson numbers, big boss numbers, but 40 million aint no shame.

Russell:
That's amazing.

Chris:
And I've been at this for a couple decades as well, having a blast. So that's why I do music for myself, is really to build branding, credibility, authority. And then for clients, I just do it because it's like if you're getting paid to do it, I'm a lot more motivated, take time away from my own business. And I just love the, the try to write some ClickFunnels lyrics. Even writing the lyrics for the ClickFunnels rap, Super-cali-funnel-istic, like stuff like that.

Russell:
We made a T-shirt that said that. I don't know if ever saw it before.

Chris:
Yeah. It's just fun. It's like I can't do that for my own brand. It is so fun to work with clients, because I could really bring out things they didn't even know about their own brand. I love it.

Russell:
Yeah. The last thing I want to ask you about, I'm curious, I don't know if you've thought about it or maybe you have or haven't. But the one thing I noticed with Connor that he also did that was really fascinating was on top of these other videos he has, he started creating series, right? So the Spin the Globe series was the first one that really made it pop, I think. Where if you haven't seen it yet, basically what he does is he spins the globe, he picks a random country, maybe it's random, maybe it's not, picks a random country, finds someone in that country. And then gives them a beat, has them write their lyrics, and he pushes them together as a song. And he started doing that. He did I think eight episodes the very first season, and then that blew up. And then that became a Spotify playlist, and he did season number two. And then they went on tour, where they're touring with all these different people.

And it was really cool. And I started thinking about that because again, my kids were the ones that every time the new Spin the Globe album would drop, my kids were like, "Dad, did you see the new Spin the Globe?" They were so excited to come tell me. And I started thinking for us, I wanted to start doing some series. So I was thinking about in my business and my life, what were series that we could do. So we actually in the last two weeks have been filming short form series that kind of tie together. So one of them I'm doing is, because I'm working on my new book right now, so the series is lik day number one of how I'm writing a best-selling book that hopefully will sell a million copies. And I'm sharing a 60 second, thing about what I'm doing today for the book.

And the next day, day number two of how I'm writing a best-selling book and hopefully selling a million copies. And I'm going to be able to go through the writing process, and then also the launching and selling the book process. I'm do another one, because I get a lot of old books in the mail. So it's like, a day in the life of a bibliomaniac, and it's like me opening eight packages that show up today and the old books I got from it. Right? So I'm curious, have you done these series, what's your thoughts on series like that, that hook people over an extended period of time?

Chris:
Yeah, I think series are, they go very viral, especially on social media. If you're willing to post it on social media, they go very viral. If you go to YouTube, they've been doing this for years, you'll see something goes really well, like a shampoo prank, someone will pour shampoo on somebody's head and it's funny, they don't know it's happening. Then they'll do shampoo prank two, shampoo prank three. It's the same video, just with different person. And every video is just millions, and millions, and millions of views. So a long time ago, people realized the algorithms favor repeatable content, like content that's very, very similar. So another example would be like day one, day two, day three, day four, day five of a process like you talked about. I did it with Shopify. Basically went from zero to a $5,000 store, kind of beginner, like how to take a store from zero to 5,000. And I did it in a series of days, and that racked up hundreds and hundreds of thousands of views organically.

People like that, because the algorithms favor it. If you can get good content when they watch day one or day two, now the algorithm's going to want to show them day three and day four, and they're going to get hooked. Another example would be these people will start with a dollar and they'll flip it. They'll see how much money can I make with this? They'll buy something, they'll sell something. Now they got $2, $3. They'll do something again, now they got five, they got 10, they got 50, they got a hundred, and they show themselves doing this. So what I would do in terms of advice for people watching, if there's any skill that you have where you know can get a result. Let's say it was building an e-comm store, building a Funnel and being able to get leads. Here's how I got a thousand leads, or here's how I got X amount of sales.

If you know can do something, you think you could repeat it again. Instead of just doing it again, think this time, I'm going to do it as every day I'm going to show you the steps until I get this result. And the results should be beginner-friendly. It shouldn't be like, here's how I'm going to make $10 million. Here's how I'm going to get the eight figure club ClickFunnels. It should be something simple for beginners. Let's see how long it takes me to make my first thousand dollars with a brand new Funnel. Or how long it takes me to make my first thousand dollars with an e-comm store. And then you just simply, you don't even really have to promote ClickFunnels as an affiliate or Shopify, it's going to be done naturally. So here's how I'm going to build a first funnel.

So the first thing I'm going to do is I'm going to get a free trial with ClickFunnels, maybe I could even do it during my free trial. And you're just kind of walking them through the process, and then underneath you have a link to be able to promote the affiliate offer. You have a link to Shopify, or ClickFunnels, or whatever you're promoting. So you're actually monetizing, you're getting views, you're promoting this. But just keep in mind these little videos, if you're doing long-form videos, you got to have shorts to go along with it. Are you doing just shorts for yours? Are they just shorts?

Russell:
Just shorts, yeah.

Chris:
Yeah. So if you guys do long form, if you're going to actually film yourself really doing the steps and filming your screen, you won't get a lot of views on that. Where are you going to get views is little like 30 second clips of that day in the life, that lead back to people want to watch the full thing afterwards.

Russell:
What I found too, in the people I've seen that have been doing series like this, is I'll find them on day 63 and then it's like I have to go backwards. Whereas normally you see a video you don't go back in time, but if they hooked me on day 63, or 13, or whatever, then I want to go back in time. Wait, what happened, and then I start scrolling back through their feed to find it. Which is rare, I think in shorts. Usually things on Instagram or TikTok, they disappear over time. But it's the first time that people I found where I've actually dug back into their accounts, to go backwards in time to try to find the other ones, because I wanted to hear the beginning of the story and where it started at.

There's a guy who I found towards the end of the year last year, and he was like 365, an ice bath the day for 365 days, and I think I found him day 300. So I was scrolling back trying to find day one. Where was he at then and what was his, and as I scroll back through, I saw these other ones and I spent 45 minutes down this dude's channel watching 60 second shorts. Whereas typically if it's just a one-off short, a lot of times you see it and then it's kind of over, versus me now getting back into this whole journey. Binge watching him to catch up to where he is today. So it's interesting with the stuff you can do with that.

Chris:
So if anybody's watching wants to get ideas, I mean if there's something you're going to be doing anyways, let's say you were doing 75 hard or whatever. Always just be thinking, maybe I could journal my progress. Maybe I could create little short every single day to showing my progress. Or it's just like those selfie pictures. People take a selfie picture every day and after 365 days, they're a new human. It's just crazy. It's really about the end destination. It's about that day 100, when you reach your conclusion of what you did with the book. That goes super viral, because it's like, wow, because not only did you do the thing, but you journaled it. It was like full transparency. It was like a documentary of how you got there. So not only did you do the thing, but people can go back now and they can learn.

So what happens, you get spillover content. When you get these little viral videos in the middle of that series, now you're going to get all this spillover to all the other videos on the channel. Your subscribers are going to grow, your views are going to grow. That's kind of what Connor Price did. Connor Price wasn't really successful with some of his first shorts, but when you take the carrot flute short, which just did massive. Now that people are watching this, not only is the algorithm showing more, but they just want to watch more Connor Price.
They're like, "Oh, who is this Connor price guy? Now I know him and I like him, because this was entertaining." And then after you watch a whole bunch of him, you're sitting there and you've just watched 20 of his things, maybe some of them multiple times, you're also sharing with friends. So he's going to go mega viral, because of this. So it's a little viral recipe. It's create these kind of series that get people hooked that they have to go back and watch these other ones for the tricks. It's like a podcast, but with short form, it's more interesting. People don't have time to go watch all of Joe Rogan's past thousands of episodes.

Russell:
Four hours of-

Chris:
Every episode.

Russell:
Every episode for the rest of your life.

Chris:
So it's just easier to do with short form content. It's more realistic.

Russell:
So cool. Well, man, I appreciate you jumping on this podcast with me, but also just helping us on our business with this. I think, obviously I'm not a rapper outside of today for the first time ever, but just this concept of edutainment, and bringing more things that are interesting and fun. I think right now there's so many people that are just teaching, I look at social, I go through my feed, it's just like boring now. Everyone's just just teaching a thing, or here's a principle, or here's whatever, versus this where it's fun and exciting and engaging. And so, I'm trying in our business to lead really heavily with this stuff, just because the whole game of marketing is about pattern interrupts, right?

A rap showing up in your news feed is a pattern interrupt. Using these series is a pattern interrupt versus everyone else who's doing the pattern. And I think a lot of people are going to be too scared or too nervous to do that kind of thing. So those who are willing to be the early adopters and shift that way are going to have huge results from it. So at least that's my plan. That's why I'm going hardcore into it right now.

Chris:
Well, I mean, so we're here in Vegas, and if you go to casinos and you just watch, people are doing slots all day, right? Pressing, or the old school slots.

Russell:
Yeah.

Chris:
So there's this thing called the variable reward system. And social media news feeds operate on the same process. So when you're scrolling, I call it the thumb dance. You just got your phone out, you're scrolling, you're doing the thumb dance like this thumb, thumb, thumb, thumb, thumb. And the idea is you're just scrolling through a bunch of nonsense until you find that one post that justified your time. You're like, oh wow, somebody got married, or somebody had a kid, or something traumatic happened, or whatever it was that got your attention. That's the scroll stopper, right? The thing is that ads usually are the things you want to skip right past, right? You just want to skip right past ads, and you want to find something organic that's truly made for social. So that's the variable reward system is that when you're gambling, you're mostly losing all the time on a slot machine, just lose, lose, lose.

But then all of a sudden you win and you're like, "Wait, I just want a lot of money." And it gives you dopamine and it makes you want to do it again, and you're going for this jackpot. That's how social media operates. The news feed is like a slot machine. Every single time you see a post that's value, it's like a dopamine hit and it makes you want to go again. You've justified the last 15 minutes sitting on the toilet, scrolling the news feed. So that is essentially what you want to do as a marketer. You want to realize that you want to be that dopamine hit when they're scrolling through.

So you want to figure out how can I make this native to the platform? How can it feel organic? How could it be a little entertaining, not feel like an ad? As long as you can get that scroll stop and kick in that variable reward system, the dopamine, then your ads are going to perform well. Because the algorithm is going to see it as nice organic content, and they're going to start showing it to everybody. You're going to get likes, shares, comments, and everything. So that's the recipe I follow is I think about it like it's literally a Vegas slot machine and a Facebook news feed as the same thing, and that's helped a lot.

Russell:
That's awesome, man. Well, thanks man. I appreciate you, and hopefully you guys all got some cool stuff for yourselves. And should we show them the rap now?

Chris:
I mean, if you want, I think it's epic.

Russell:
We promised we show you if you'd stay till the end. So-

Chris:
Let's do it.

Russell:
Here it is. Russell Brunson with his very first ever freestyle rap. Let's check it out.

Russell Brunson Video:
I was chilling on the beat. Thinking about my niche, and how to drive traffic so that I can stack the leads. They call me big Russ, build a Funnel like a beast. Every day I'm rustling, huh, Sunny D. Ooh, I got my VSL track CPL. My EPC about to make another mill. All I had to do is fine tune it like a skill. Now my TikTok popping like a new BBL. Woo.

Russell:
There we go. All right, thanks everybody. We'll see you guys in the next video.

Chris Record Music Video:
Ain't nobody messing with my click funnels, click funnels, click. Ain't no traffic better than my high converting click funnels, click funnels, click.

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